From February 2017, information about the work of the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow is available and updated on the University of Glasgow website.

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News Archive for May 2014

Inequalities in mental health are associated with inequalities in sleeping difficulties

May 26, 2014

New research from the University of Glasgow suggests helping women and those in poorer circumstances to sleep better may help reduce inequalities in mental health.

Read complete article: Inequalities in mental health are associated with inequalities in sleeping difficulties

Condom use is talked about as a masculine behaviour by young offenders

May 22, 2014

A study led by researchers at the University of Glasgow of incarcerated young male offenders found that just under a third reported using contraception on all or most occasions of sex. These men emphasised power, authority and control when talking about their condom use.

Read complete article: Condom use is talked about as a masculine behaviour by young offenders

Seeing alcohol use in films predicts drinking among low-risk teens

May 11, 2014

A six European country study, including Scotland (participants surveyed by researchers from the MRC/CSO Social & Public Health Sciences Unit in Glasgow), has found teenagers at low risk for drinking who saw more alcohol use in films were more likely to start drinking themselves.

Read complete article: Seeing alcohol use in films predicts drinking among low-risk teens

Women seek later abortion in Scotland for many different reasons

May 9, 2014

A study by researchers from the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit (SPHSU) at the University of Glasgow indicates for the first time that women in Scotland seek late abortions for a variety of complex reasons.

Read complete article: Women seek later abortion in Scotland for many different reasons

Heightened incidence of acute myocardial infarction among Aboriginal people in Australia

May 6, 2014

Rates of first acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were found to be more than twice as high among Aboriginal people compared to non-Aboriginal people, according to the findings of new collaborative research led by the University of Western Sydney and including researchers at the University of Glasgow.

Read complete article: Heightened incidence of acute myocardial infarction among Aboriginal people in Australia

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