From February 2017, information about the work of the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow is available and updated on the University of Glasgow website.

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An NIHR-funded trial evaluating the effectiveness of a programme to help football fans lose weight, feel better and live a healthier lifestyle, has published its full findings in Public Health Research, today.

Football fans in training - full report published

posted on: Feb 16, 2015

An NIHR-funded trial evaluating the effectiveness of a programme to help football fans lose weight, feel better and live a healthier lifestyle, has published its full findings in Public Health Research, today.

The study, which published in The Lancet and BMC Public Health last year, found that men who participated in the Football Fans in Training (FFIT) scheme lost more than nine times as much weight as those who did not take part in the programme. Participants also benefited from reduced waist size less body fat and lower blood pressure, which can all be associated with a lower risk of heart disease, diabetes and stroke.

Chief Investigator, Professor Kate Hunt, from the Medical Research Council/Chief Scientist Office Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow, said: “Weight management and dieting are often wrongly viewed as ‘women’s’ issues, meaning that some men do not want to take part in existing weight management programmes. The FFIT programme shows that men are keen and able to make positive changes to their health in the right circumstances, and the football club is a great setting for weight management and other health initiatives for men. Participants really enjoyed being with other men who had a shared interest in football and similar health issues to address. They loved having the opportunity to spend time at the club, using parts of the stadium that they couldn’t ordinarily access. They appreciated the chance to be encouraged, trained, and informed by the club’s coaches. This model has real potential for the future.”

The full report can be read here.