From February 2017, information about the work of the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow is available and updated on the University of Glasgow website.

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Rates of first acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were found to be more than twice as high among Aboriginal people compared to non-Aboriginal people, according to the findings of new collaborative research led by the University of Western Sydney and including researchers at the University of Glasgow.

Heightened incidence of acute myocardial infarction among Aboriginal people in Australia

posted on: May 6, 2014

Rates of first acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were found to be more than twice as high among Aboriginal people compared to non-Aboriginal people, according to the findings of new collaborative research led by the University of Western Sydney and including Professor Alastair Leyland at the University of Glasgow. The relative difference between the two groups tended to be more pronounced in more disadvantaged and remote areas.

The study investigated disparities in rates of AMI between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in the 199 Statistical Local Areas (SLAs) in New South Wales, Australia. Using routinely collected and linked hospital and mortality data from 2002 to 2007, the researchers identified almost 30 priority areas for universal and targeted preventive interventions that had both high rates of AMI for Aboriginal people and large disparities in rates.

The full paper can be found here.