From February 2017, information about the work of the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow is available and updated on the University of Glasgow website.

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A special issue of Social Science and Medicine has recognised this Unit's contribution to gender and health research by republishing a number of landmark articles.

Landmark Research on Gender and Health

posted on: Oct 16, 2007

 

A special issue of Social Science & Medicine has recognised this Unit's major contribution to gender and health research by republishing a number of ‘landmark' articles.  

 

This online publication brings together seminal research on gender and health from the 1990s to the present that has been selected by Ellen Annandale, the Editor-in-Chief of the journal. It includes the following papers from this Unit:

 

Helen Sweeting. Reversals of fortune? Sex differences in health in childhood and adolescence. First published in Social Science and Medicine, Volume 40, Issue 1, January 1995, pages 77-90.

 

Sally Macintyre, Kate Hunt and Helen Sweeting. Gender differences in health are things as simple as they seem? First published in Social Science and Medicine, Volume 42, Issue 4, February 1996, pages 617-624.

 

Carol Emslie, Damien Ridge, Sue Ziebland, Kate Hunt. Men's accounts of depression: reconstructing or resisting hegemonic masculinity? First published in Social Science and Medicine, Volume 62, Issue 9, May 2006, pages 2246-2257.

 

The editor described these and other research in the issue as " 'defining moments' in debate...identifying theoretical and empirical lacunae in existing research and taking research in new directions." She goes on to say that "it is hoped that this showcase selection will be an aid to research and teaching and that it will encourage readers to delve deeper into the Journal where they will find a wealth of research on gender in the offing."

 

Helen Sweeting has said that the special issue demonstrates the Unit's long term commitment to studying gender and health, and highlights the change in emphasis over the years from describing to trying to explain differences.

 

The online issue can be accessed here.