From February 2017, information about the work of the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow is available and updated on the University of Glasgow website.

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Recent work at the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit found that Scottish mortality rates, calculated at small area level, were highest in deprived areas that lost population in the year before the 2001 census.

Mortality rates, deprivation and small area population mobility in Scotland

posted on: Nov 15, 2010

Recent work at the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit found that Scottish mortality rates, calculated at small area level, were highest in deprived areas that lost population in the year before the 2001 census.
 
Areas were classified as decreasing, increasing or stable (with high or low turnover) on the basis of moves made in the year prior to the census and grouped in terms of deprivation and population mobility. All-cause mortality rates were highest in deprived areas that declined in population. Within the most deprived areas, mortality rates were lowest in stable populations with low turnover. Comparing these two areas types, the specific causes of deaths that contributed most to the excess mortality rates were causes linked to alcohol and drug use, suicides and assault. Focusing on individuals living in deprived areas that are declining in population could help to reduce widening inequalities for these specific causes of death.