From February 2017, information about the work of the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow is available and updated on the University of Glasgow website.

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Study shows that Aboriginal Australians who have suffered an acute Myocardial infarction (AMI) are less likely to be revascularised than non-Aboriginal Australians.

Revascularisation rates lower among Aboriginal Australians

posted on: Feb 27, 2013

Aboriginal Australians who have suffered an acute Myocardial infarction (AMI) are less likely to be revascularised than non-Aboriginal Australians. This is the latest research from a team led by the University of Western Sydney and including Professor Alastair Leyland from the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit. However, this discrepancy can largely be explained by the lower revascularisation rates at the hospital of first admission for all patients admitted to smaller regional and rural hospitals and, to a lesser extent, lower private health insurance cover among Aboriginal patients.
 
The research, published in Circulation, presented the analysis of all 59,282 patients aged between 25 and 84 who were admitted to public hospitals in New South Wales with a diagnosis of AMI between 2000 and 2008. One third of Aboriginal patients underwent revascularisation within 30 days of admission compared to 40% of non-Aboriginal patients. Aboriginal patients had a revascularization rate 37% lower than non-Aboriginal patients of the same age, sex, year of admission and AMI type. Within the same hospital, however, Aboriginal patients had a revascularization rate 18% lower, and accounting for comorbidities, substance use and private health insurance further explained this disparity.
 
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