From February 2017, information about the work of the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow is available and updated on the University of Glasgow website.

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Results from the Scottish Health Survey 2012 (funded by the Scottish Government) have been published in the eight report in the series, now conducted annually. Dr Linsay Gray and Prof Alastair Leyland from the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit authored chapters on smoking, obesity and long-term illness.

Scottish smoking, obesity and long-term illness updates – the Scottish Health Survey 2012

posted on: Sep 26, 2013

Results from the Scottish Health Survey 2012 (funded by the Scottish Government) have been published in the eight report in the series, now conducted annually. Dr Linsay Gray and Prof Alastair Leyland from the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit authored chapters on smoking, obesity and long-term illness.

The main findings are:

Smoking

  • One in four adults was a current cigarette smoker and those aged 25 to 44 were most likely to smoke.
  • Smoking prevalence among 16 to 64 year olds has declined from 35% in 1995 to 27%.
  • Smokers smoked an average of 13.5 cigarettes per day in 2012 (higher for men), which has decreased over time.
  • One in six non-smoking adults were exposed to second-hand smoke in their own or someone else’s home and 16% reported exposure in a public place.
  • One in five children lived in a household where someone smokes within the home.
  • Around three-quarters of smokers said that they would like to quit. 

Adult obesity

  • 27% of adults were obese, and 68% of men and 60% of women were overweight. 
  • Since 1995, the proportion of adults aged 16-64 who were overweight or obese increased from 52% to 62% in 2012; the prevalence of obesity increased from 17% to 26%, although the levels have remained fairly constant since 2008.
  • The mean adult BMI was 27.3 kg/m2. 

Child obesity

  • 65% of boys and 70% of girls had a healthy weight; those aged 12-15 were least likely to have healthy weight.
  • The proportion of children at risk of obesity rose from 14% to 17% between 1998 and 2008 but has remained stable since then.
  • The proportion at risk of overweight including obese increased from 30% in 1998. to 33% in 2008 but since then has fluctuated with no clear pattern (31% in 2012).
  • 2.3% of girls and 1.4% of boys were at risk of underweight. 

Long-term conditions 

  • Almost half of adults reported having a long-term condition (a physical or mental health condition or illness lasting/likely to last for twelve months or more).
  • A third had a long-term condition that limited their daily activities.
  • Women and older adults were more likely to report having a long-term condition.
  • Since 1998 the proportion of adults with doctor-diagnosed asthma has increased from 11% to 17%.
  • Declining from 18% in 1998, 13% of children had been diagnosed with asthma, with boys more likely than girls.
  • 4% of adults had been diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
  • One in six adults had a cardiovascular condition.
  • 5.5% of all adults in Scotland had diabetes.

 

A summary of the main findings can be found here.

The Scottish Health Survey is a designated National Statistics product.  This means that the statistics are deemed to be compliant with the Code of Practice on Official Statistics, produced according to sound methods and managed impartially and objectively in the public interest.