From February 2017, information about the work of the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow is available and updated on the University of Glasgow website.

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Results from the Scottish Health Survey 2010 (funded by the Scottish Government) have been published in the sixth report in the series, now conducted annually. Dr Linsay Gray and Prof Alastair Leyland from the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit authored chapters on fruit and vegetable consumption, obesity and respiratory health.

The latest on diet, obesity and respiratory health in Scotland – the Scottish Health Survey 2010

posted on: Sep 27, 2011

Results from the Scottish Health Survey 2010 (funded by the Scottish Government) have been published in the sixth report in the series, now conducted annually. Dr Linsay Gray and Prof Alastair Leyland from the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit authored chapters on fruit and vegetable consumption, obesity and respiratory health.

The main findings are:
Fruit and vegetable consumption
The proportion of adults meeting the recommended daily intake of five or more portions of fruit and vegetables (20% of men and 23% of women in 2010; average consumption 3.3 for women and 3.1 for men) has not changed significantly over time.
In 2010, 12% of children met the recommendations and the mean portion was 2.6, with little difference since 2003.
 
Obesity
Adult (16-64 years) obesity has steadily increased from 16% to 27% in men and 17% to 28% in women since 1995. The proportion of adults aged who are overweight or obese has increased from 56% to 66% in men, and 47% to 60% in women over this period.
30% of children were overweight or obese, almost half of whom were obese, with small variations since 1998.
 
Respiratory health
Around 15% of adults aged reported wheezing, and 13% of men and 15% of women reported asthma in the previous year.
30% of men and 34% of women who smoked 20 or more cigarettes per day had wheezed in the past 12 months compared with just 9% of men and women who have never smoked.
The proportion reporting breathlessness when walking on level ground or uphill declined from 30% to 20% among women and from 20% to 13% among men.
The prevalence of wheezing and asthma was generally highest among more socio-economically disadvantaged groups.
The proportion of children that had wheezed in the last 12 months declined from 16% to 12% since 1998; the prevalence of asthma decreased from 18% to 14%.
Children living in a household in which at least one person smoked indoors regularly were almost twice as likely to have asthma as those living in households where no-one smoked indoors (19% versus 11%).
 
A summary of the main findings can be found here.
The Scottish Health Survey is a designated National Statistics product. This means that the statistics are deemed to be compliant with the Code of Practice on Official Statistics, produced according to sound methods and managed impartially and objectively in the public interest.