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Results from the Scottish Health Survey 2009 (funded by the Scottish Government) have been published in the fifth report in the series, now conducted annually. Dr Linsay Gray and Prof Alastair Leyland from the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit authored chapters on diet and adult obesity.

The latest on diet and obesity levels in Scotland – the Scottish Health Survey 2009

posted on: Sep 28, 2010

Results from the Scottish Health Survey 2009 (funded by the Scottish Government) have been published in the fifth report in the series, now conducted annually. Dr Linsay Gray and Prof Alastair Leyland from the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit authored chapters on diet and adult obesity.

The main findings are:
 
Diet
  •  Women’s consumption of fruit and vegetables (3.4 portions per day on average) has increased slightly since 2003, but men’s consumption is unchanged (3.1 portions). 22% of men and 25% of women consumed the recommended five or more portions per day in 2009, but consumption was lower for younger adults.
  • Daily fruit and vegetable consumption has increased slightly for girls since 2003 to 2.9 portions but has not changed for boys (2.7 portions); 14% of children met recommendations, but consumption was lower at older ages.
  • Boys’ fruit and vegetable consumption was greater in higher socio-economic status households and in areas of low deprivation; for boys and girls it increased with physical activity, parental consumption, and the number of times the family ate together.
  • There have been some improvements to children’s general diets since 2003, with a rise in consumption of oily fish and a drop in crisp consumption.
  • The quality of children’s diets was better at younger ages, in higher socio-economic status households and in the least deprived areas.
Adult obesity
  • Since 1995 there has been a steady upward trend in adult obesity (26.9% for men and 27.6% for women in 2009) and overweight including obesity (68.0% of men and 61.0% of women in 2009), with higher levels at older ages.
  • Average waist-hip ratios and waist circumferences have increased since 1998.
  • The proportions with raised waist-hip ratio in 2008/2009 were 35% for men and 41% for women, and for raised waist circumference 33% and 45%, respectively; figures were highest in the middle-aged groups and, particularly among women, those of low socio-economic status.
  • Based on guidelines, waist circumference and weight relative to height are used to classify people’s risk of diseases such as CVD and type 2 diabetes. 18% of men and 16% of women have an increased risk of disease; 13% and 18% have a high risk; 22% of both have a very high risk and 1% and 3% have an extremely high risk.
A summary of the main findings can be found here.
The Scottish Health Survey is a designated National Statistics product. This means that the statistics are deemed to be compliant with the Code of Practice on Official Statistics, produced according to sound methods and managed impartially and objectively in the public interest.