From February 2017, information about the work of the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow is available and updated on the University of Glasgow website.

Influence of Family Life

This theme develops further strands of our past and current work on how parent-child relationships, schools and the media shape sexual health. Our aims are to investigate:

1. how the effects of family life on health-related outcomes vary between social groups
2. the extent to which features of family life are transmitted over generations
3. how family influences on health outcomes are interrelated with those of schools and the media
4. how family influences can be modified to benefit sexual and other health outcomes.

Publications

2014

Parkes A, Sweeting H, Wight D. Growing up in Scotland: family and school influences on children’s social and emotional well-being. Edinburgh, 2014

open access  

2012

Buston K, Parkes A, Thomson H, Wight D, Fenton C. Parenting interventions for male young offenders: a review of evidence on what works. Journal of Adolescence 2012;35:731-742

pubmed  open access  

Buston K, Wight D. Young fathers in prison: helping them parent. In: Simpson C, editor Scotland: the best place in the world to bring up children? A collection of essays about parenting in Scotland. Edinburgh: Parenting across Scotland, 2012:128-30.

Parkes A, Sweeting H, Wight D. Growing up in Scotland: overweight, obesity and activity - Main Report. Edinburgh, 2012

open access  

Parkes A, Sweeting H, Wight D. Growing up in Scotland: overweight, obesity and activity - Research Findings no. 4. Edinburgh, 2012

open access  

Parkes A, Sweeting H, Wight D. Growing up in Scotland: overweight, obesity and activity - Technical Appendix. Edinburgh, 2012

open access  

2011

Packard C, Bezylak V, McLean JS, Batty GD, Ford I, Burns H, Cavanagh J, Deans KA, Henderson M, McGinty A, Millar K, Sattar N, Shiels PG, Velupillai YN, Tannahill C. Early life socioeconomic adversity is associated in adult life with chronic inflammation, carotid atherosclerosis, poorer lung function and decreased cognitive performance: a cross-sectional, population-based study. BMC Public Health 2011;11:42

pubmed  open access  

Parkes A, Henderson M, Wight D, Nixon C. Is parenting associated with teenagers’ early sexual risk-taking, autonomy and relationship with sexual partners?. Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health 2011;43:30-40

pubmed  open access  

Parkes A, Wight D. Growing up in Scotland: parenting and children's health - Main Report. Edinburgh, 2011

open access  

Parkes A, Wight D. Growing up in Scotland: parenting and children's health - Research Findings no.3/2011. Research Findings no.3/2011, Edinburgh, 2011

open access  

Parkes A, Wight D. Growing up in Scotland: parenting and children's health - Technical Appendix. Edinburgh, 2011

open access  

2010

Buston K, Wight D. Self-reported sexually transmitted infection testing behaviour amongst incarcerated young male offenders: findings from a qualitative study. Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care 2010;36:7-11

pubmed  open access  

Buston K. Experiences of, and attitudes towards, pregnancy and fatherhood amongst incarcerated young male offenders: findings from a qualitative study. Social Science & Medicine 2010;71:2212-18

pubmed  

Remes P, Renju J, Nyalali K, Benedict J, Medard L, Kimaryo M, Changalucha J, Obasi A, Wight D. Dusty discos and dangerous desires: community perceptions of adolescent sexual and reproductive health risks and vulnerability and the potential role of parents in rural Mwanza, Tanzania. Culture, Health & Sexuality 2010;12:279-92

pubmed  

2009

Nyalali K, Remes P, Wight D. Developing methods to study parent-child relationships in rural sub-Saharan Africa: an exploratory project in Mwanza, northern Tanzania. MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit Occasional Paper no. 20, Glasgow, 2009

open access  

2008

Buston K. Behind and beyond the prison bars: young offenders talk about sex and relationships. MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit Occasional Paper no. 18, Glasgow, 2008